Lucretius: On the Nature of Things! As a test to compare the versions, here is one of the key sections from Book I, first in the Munro edition (I have not preserved the line breaks): When human life to view lay foully prostrate upon earth crushed down under the weight of religion, who showed her head from the quarters of heaven with hideous aspect lowering upon mortals, a man of Greece ventured first to lift up his mortal eyes to her face and first to withstand her to her face. And thus his will and hardy wisdom won; What things can rise to being, what cannot, The flaming ramparts of the world, until While I defer to Munro on scholarship in absence of evidence to the contrary, Johnston’s version seems to me to preserve much the same meaning, and succeeds in doing so in a way that is much more understandable than that of Leonard. Read in English by Daniel Vimont. Would show her head along the region skies, Bravely against this menace. On the Nature of Things By Lucretius. The Goal of Life – The Full Cup / Fullness of Pleasure Model, Virtue As Instrumental Rather Than An End In Itself, Against Platonic and Aristotelian Idealism, Letter to Herodotus – Reference Translation, Epicurus’ Letter to Pythocles – Elemental Edition, Letter to Pythocles – Reference Translation, Letter to Menoeceus – Reference Translation, A Map Through “A Few Days In Athens” And the World of Epicurus, Cicero: Torquatus’ Defense of Epicurus from “On Ends”, Gassendi’s Epicurus – Part 1 – Life of Epicurus, Gassendi’s Epicurus – Part 2A – Of Philosophy in General, Gassendi’s Epicurus – Part 2B – The First Part of Philosophy, Canonick, of the Criteries, Gassendi’s Epicurus – Part 2C – The Second Part of Philosophy, Physick, or, of Nature, Gassendi’s Epicurus – Part 2D – The Third Part of Philosophy, Ethick, or Morals, Thomas Jefferson: Pro Epicurus / Contra Plato, Lion of Epicurus – Lucian and His Epicurean Passages, Ante Oculos – Epicurus and The Evidence-Based Life, A Life Worthy of the Gods – The Life And Work of Epicurus. Stallings, Lucretius: The Nature of Things. Od. 99–ca. This elegant new translation at last restores the poetry to one of the greatest and most influential poems in the Western tradition. While acknowledging then my debt to Munro for the main .pirit of the translation and often for words and phuses which seemed to me inevit-able, I have tried at once to embody the resulu of more recent Lucretian scholarship, and to preserve a more THE NATURE OF THINGS TITUS LUCRETIUS CARUS must have been born soon after 100 BC and is likely to have died before his poem was given to the world, probably in the 50s BC.Almost nothing is known about his life. So his force, By Cassius Amicus Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. The background on what is known of Lucretius' life, contemporary events, and Epicureanism is all very helpful. De rerum natura (usually translated as On the Nature of Things) is a philosophical epic poem written by Lucretius in Latin around 55 BCE. Thus Munro preserved the meaning better than most versions which are readily available on the internet, such as that of William Emory Leonard. Here’s the same selection, from the Ian Johnston version: When to all eyes men’s life lay foully crushed throughout the land beneath the heavy burden  of religion, who, from heavenly regions would show her head, menacing mortal men with her hideous face, a Greek man was the first who dared raise his mortal eyes against her, the first one to oppose her, undeterred by stories of the gods, by lightning strikes or menacing rumbles from the heavens. Until today I was unaware of a 2010 edition of On The Nature of Things produced by Ian Johnston and available at the website linked here.. That site states: “Ian Johnston’s new poetic translation brings out the full emotional range of this great work and captures the restless and intense urgency of the original text.The English is an accurate rendition of Lucretius … He is the author of the great didactic poem in hexameters, De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things). Translated by William Ellery Leonard (1876 - 1944). This sumptuous account of a secular cosmos … Therefore the living force of his soul gained the day: on he passed far beyond the flaming walls of the world and traversed throughout in mind and spirit the immeasurable universe; whence he returns a conqueror to tell us what can, what cannot come into being; in short on what principle each thing has its powers defined, its deep-set boundary mark. Lucretius (Titus Lucretius Carus) lived ca. Certainly Humphries takes his own liberties with the text, but in my view he preserves the meaning with a force and style — and a choice of words — that seems true to the original. Made this man cower, but drove him all the more Glowering on mortals with her hideous face- (eds. And so the living power of his mind  won out, and he moved forward, far beyond the flaming bulwarks of the world, and then, in his mind and spirit, made his way through the boundless immensity of all things. And forward thus he fared afar, beyond All Rights Reserved. Therefore religion is put underfoot and trampled upon in turn; us his victory brings level with heaven. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura William Ellery Leonard, Ed. The nature of things: a didactic poem : translated from the Latin of Titus Lucretius Carus, accompanied with the original text, and illustrated with notes philological and explanatory 1805, Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme Often overlooked, especially by those who read On the Nature of Things in translation, is Lucretiuss contribution to his native Latin. By grim Religion looming from the skies, We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. A Greek it was who first opposing dared This Johnston version is also available as an audiobook read by Hugh Ross here. Wherefore Religion now is under foot, The title of Lucretius’s work translates that of the chief work of Epicurus, Peri physeōs (On Nature). On the Nature of Things, written in the first century BCE by Titus Lucretius Carus, is one of the principle expositions on Epicurean philosophy and science to … The crossbars at the gates of Nature old. Commentary: Many comments have been posted about On the Nature of Things. He wandered the unmeasurable All. De Rerum Natura is Lucretius's majestic elaboration of Greek Epicurean physics and psychology in an epic that unfolds over the course of six books. Norman DeWitt’s “Epicurus And His Philosophy”. Little is known of his life, although two tantalizing bits of gossip were passed on by St. Jerome: that he was poisoned by a madness-inducing aphrodisiac given him by his wife, and that his great poem On the Nature of Things was … On the Nature of Things (Leonard translation) Titus Lucretius CARUS (c. 99 BCE - 55 BCE) , translated by William Ellery LEONARD (1876 - 1944) On the Nature of Things, written in the first century BCE by Titus Lucretius Carus, is one of the principle expositions on Epicurean philosophy and science to have survived from … Here is the same section by Leonard, this time preserving the line breaks, since Leonard emphasized the poetic form at the expense of literal meaning: Whilst human kind Download: A text-only version is available for download. And by what law to each its scope prescribed, Titus Lucretius Carus was probably born in the early first century B.C., and died in the year 55. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Bohn Collection americana Digitizing sponsor Google Book from the collections of Harvard University Language English. Buy On The Nature Of Things. was rough and direct (especially when compared to the more sophisticated Greek); hence, Lucretius lacked an adequate vocabulary for philosophic or scientific discussion. muse allowed him only a fitful inspiration. Humphries’ version not only reads well to the eye, but in the voice of Charlton Griffin the meaning jumps out even more clearly. The Same Span of Time – The Major Works of Thomas Cooper, M.D. Throughout the lands lay miserably crushed the difficulty with verse translations is that they are forced to become paraphrases or liberal interpretations in order to satisfy the prosody. And us his victory now exalts to heaven. Instead, with even greater eagerness  he roused his spirit’s keen intelligence,  to answer his desire to be the first to break the narrow bolts of nature’s doors. The translation is accurate, clear, readable, and vigorous. With wit and wisdom, and came back to us On the Nature of Things has been divided into the following sections: Book I [94k] Book II [106k] Book III [95k] Book IV [117k] Book V [139k] Book VI [122k] Download: A 415k text-only version is available for download. The borderline, the bench mark, set forever. One of the great virtue’s of Munro’s classic edition is that he did not sacrifice clarity and fidelity of meaning for the sake of shoe-horning the English text into a forced lyrical form. Publication date 1851 Publisher H.G. Beyond the flaming ramparts of the world Its boundary stone that clings so deep in Time. prose brings out most accurately lucretius… The version read by Griffin, however, was the translation by Rolfe Humphries, and in my personal view Humphries’ version, though more clear than most, takes needless liberties with important portions of the text that are best understood in as close to the original meaning as possible. Lay foully groveling on earth, weighed down This elegant new translation at last restores the poetry to one of the greatest and most influential poems in the Western tradition. Alternative Title: “De rerum natura” On the Nature of Things, long poem written in Latin as De rerum natura by Lucretius that sets forth the physical theory of the Greek philosopher Epicurus. Titus Lucretius Carus was probably born in the early first century B.C., and died in the year 55. On the Nature of Things (Watson translation) Titus Lucretius CARUS (c. 99 BCE - 55 BCE), translated by John Selby WATSON (1804 - 1844) Written in the first century b.C., On the Nature of Things (in Latin, De Rerum Natura) is a poem in six books that aims at explaining the Epicurean philosophy to the Roman audience. The Nature of Things (1813), by Thomas Busby; On the Nature of Things (1851), by John Selby Watson (external scan) De Rerum Natura (1864; 2nd ed. Him neither story of gods nor thunderbolts nor heaven with threatening roar could quell: they only chafed the more the eager courage of his soul, filling him with desire to be the first to burst the fast bars of nature’s portals. Wow – just wow. Of gods, no lightning-flash, no thunder-peal The poem was lost during the Middle Ages, rediscovered in 1417, and first printed in 1473. Epicurus and His Philosophy – Chapters VII – The Canon, Reason, And Nature, Epicurus and His Philosophy – Chapter VIII – Sensations, Anticipations, and Feelings, Jackson Barwis: Dialogues Concerning Innate Principles, On Three Legs We Stand – Epicurus and the Dialogues of Jackson Barwis. ("Agamemnon", "Hom. Lucretius is a really difficult text and you need a translation that will point out his sources and what he's doing with them. However, his 1969 translation of De Rerum Natura--long out of print--is virtually unknown. Introductory Material, Lucretius, Texts on Epicurus, Until today I was unaware of a 2010 edition of On The Nature of Things produced by Ian Johnston and available at the website linked here. London: Penguin Group Ltd., 2007. As I write this I can certainly observe significant differences in the two versions. His Propertius in Love is available from University of California Press. Of Nature’s hold asunder. A Greek, first raised his mortal eyes The de-versification of Lucretius -- treating it as prose -- is an unintended theme of the most famous contemporary account of Of Things' Nature, Stephen Greenblatt's The Swerve: How the World Became Modern (2011).Greenblatt begins The Swerve with an account of his youthful discovery of Lucretius through Martin Ferguson Smith's excellent prose translation. His vital force of mind, a conqueror 55 BCE, but the details of his career are unknown. Here, in comparison is the Humphries version of the same text: When human life, all too conspicuous, No report Canonics – How Can I Be Confident In What I Think I Know To Be True? 5.2 and 7) as “the majesty of nature.” But this is Rouse’s translation, whereas in the translation … Explored the vast immensities of space My initial review is that though there are significant differences in their versions, Johnston also chose to follow Munro’s lead in preferring understandability over preservation of a lyrical form. For comparison purposes the less literal William Leonard 1916 edition in poem form is available at Perseus here . Whence he to us, a conqueror, reports Little is known of his life, although two tantalizing bits of gossip were passed on by St. Jerome: that he was poisoned by a madness-inducing aphrodisiac given him by his wife, and that his great poem On the Nature of Things was … A Metrical Translation by Lucretius (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. On The Nature of Things is sweeping in scope and detail, but in the end it is essentially a presentation of the Epicurean method for answering the most … The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. Munro. 2. For this edition, Professor Smith provides a revised translation… LibriVox recording of On the Nature of Things by Titus Lucretius Carus (c.99 BC - 55 BC). Thus recently A.A. Long (“Lucretius on Nature and the Epicurean Self,” in K. Algra et al. The translation includes notes to assist the reader who is encountering Lucretius for the first time.”, The thing that immediately impresses me is that this translation states that it is based on the Latin text of  H.A.J. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. On first glance it appears that Johnston’s version also favors clarity over poetry. Lucretius, Roman poet; and Hutchinson, possibly his earliest English translator. In my own case, I came across the Leonard edition several times over the years, and always put it aside as hopelessly obscure. For this edition, Professor Smith provides a revised translation… The first three books provide a fundamental account of being and nothingness, matter and space, the atoms and their movement, the infinity of the universe both as regards time and space, the regularity of reproduction (no prodigies, everything in its proper habitat), the nature of mind (animus, directing thought) and spirit (anima, sentience) as mate… Published October 13, 2012 Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the … Have a look at what they say of his concluding passage, the one where he's translating Thucydides as a test. And by his victory we reach the stars. Lucretius - On The Nature of Things This Wiki will contain the public domain translations of the Daniel Browne 1734 Edition , the Hugh Munro 1886 Edition , and the Cyril Bailey 1936 edition . To be the first to spring the tight-barred gates Munro’s edition is available in original form on the NewEpicurean website here and on Google Books. I hope to supplement this post with additional commentary as I listen to the audiobook and review the text of the Ian Johnston, but at least at this point I see this work as a valuable addition to the library of anyone interested in the study of Epicureanism. For me, the definitive voice of Lucretius will always be Charlton Griffin, and I am not sure how I am going to warm up to Hugh Ross’ “refined” English accent. And what cannot, limits and boundaries, Check our list of Frequently Asked Questions At EpicureanFriends.com. However, his 1969 translation of De Rerum Natura—long out of print—is virtually unknown. Physics – What Is The Nature of the Universe?

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